How to not fumble your estate plan

My favorite time of year has finally come again: University of Washington Husky Football! After over of a year and a half of pandemic life it is finally time to start living life somewhat normally again. And watching football is a good place to start.

I would be remiss if I did not mention that another good place to start is in doing the things that were not possible during the peaks of COVID-19, namely in-office meetings, especially signings. Recently, businesses in Washington state were allowed to start reopening and functioning close to normal. I am very excited to be able to work with my clients in-person again. I want to assure those who are not completely comfortable with this that measures will be taken to offer as much protection as possible. Masks will be worn, social distancing will be practiced, and surfaces will be wiped down before and after each meeting. Appointments by video call or phone will also be available and advised for consultations.

As we start to move out of the pandemic, my main goal is to be there for my clients and to help them with their planning needs. If this past year and a half has shown us anything it is that it is imperative to be prepared. I am here to guide you through this.

-Derek Jensen

 

Covid-19 Updates

As COVID-19 regulations are being rolled back, we now have to re-learn to be comfortable with the things we used to do. Our business is completely open and in-person appointments are available for those that find them most conducive to our work here, but we have had immense success with our virtual meetings and other ways to address all of our client’s needs. All of these options are still available. Our goal is to help our clients move into our new future feeling completely safe.

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